Please note that some of the visuals in this blog are not for sensitive viewers

We often are privileged to witness unusual scenes in the bush, and that is one of the best things. No two days are ever the same! We were out in some rather heavy rain, and the game wasn’t too great. The wet weather often means that there is little to no general game, as they try to hide from the rain in thickets. After a period of searching, the guests were quite keen to get back to camp and have something warm to drink, so we started making our way back.

Image by Andrew Khosa

Image by Andrew Khosa

As we got onto one of the cutlines, out of the bushes ran a lioness with six cubs in tow, we then heard the very distinct distress call of a Cape Buffalo and immediately followed the cats through the bush.

When we finally got to the scene, we found that the Nkuhuma pride lionesses along with a Birmingham male lion had pulled down a cape buffalo bull. Large cats often use the rainfall as perfect cover for their stalks, as their movements often go unheard and their scent is not on the wind.

 

The pride of lions had pinned down this large male buffalo, and although its distress calls were heard by another bull, his attempts at a rescue were unsuccessful with so many lions.

The one lioness had already started feeding on the buffalo, while he was still alive, and field guide Myke Glasson captured some rather unusual footage of this behaviour. Although it is graphic, and often seen as cruel by us humans, this is the circle of life in the bush, and for the lions to survive, they need to kill.

This kill did feed all of them for a number of days, and then the scavengers would get a meal from it too – so it does provide food for numerous species.

Image by Andrew Khosa

Image by Andrew Khosa

Image by Andrew Khosa

Image by Andrew Khosa

It goes to show that you never know what is around the next corner!